Paula Glazebrook | Holliston MA Real Estate Real Estate, Ashland MA Real Estate Real Estate



15 Hillside Dr, Holliston, MA 01746

Single-Family

$925,000
Price

13
Rooms
6
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
Large and airy 5 bedroom home sitting on nearly 2 private acres in one of Holliston's favorite neighborhoods.The first floor offers a spacious updated kitchen open to the light filled vaulted family room with sliding doors opening onto the deck. With a spacious living room and dining room this home is perfect for entertaining family and friends. First floor home office with built-ins.On the second floor there are 4 good sized bedrooms including a master suite with beautifully updated bathroom with free standing tub and tiled shower plus a recently updated family bathroom.Above the garage, accessible from the side hall, there is a large 5th bedroom/bonus room with walk-in closet.The finished walk-out basement is perfect as an in-law with bedroom, recently updated bathroom, living room, flex/office space and pool/tv room. Showing start Saturday February 27th.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses




Do you know home selling lingo? If not, miscommunications may arise that prevent you from maximizing the value of your house. Perhaps even worse, you risk making poor home selling decisions due to the fact that you don't fully understand the real estate terms included in a home sale agreement.

Fortunately, we're here to bring clarity to assorted home selling terms that you may encounter as you proceed along the home selling journey.

Let's take a look at three common home selling terms that every property seller needs to know.

1. Depreciation

Over time, the value of your home may deteriorate due to age, wear and tear and other problems. This is referred to as "depreciation," and depreciation ultimately may impact your ability to get the best price for your house.

To find out how much your house's value has depreciated, it may be worthwhile to conduct a home appraisal before you list your residence. That way, you can analyze your house's strengths and weaknesses. You also can uncover innovative ways to boost your home's appearance both inside and out, thereby ensuring you can set the optimal initial asking price for your residence.

2. House Closing

A house closing refers to the final transfer of ownership from home seller to homebuyer. Thus, once you and a homebuyer are ready to dot the I's and cross the T's on a home sale agreement, you'll complete the house closing process.

During a house closing, all terms of a contract between a home seller and homebuyer must be met. Moreover, the home deed will be recorded, and the house will finally be sold.

The house closing is a key part of the home selling cycle. At this point, a home seller will receive final payment for a house and transfer ownership of the property to the buyer.

3. Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent plays a pivotal role in the home selling process, and for good reason. If you hire an expert real estate agent, you should have no trouble navigating the home selling journey.

Typically, a real estate agent handles all of the tasks associated with listing and selling a house. This housing market professional will help you promote your residence to potential homebuyers, host open houses and home showings and even negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf. Plus, if you receive an offer on a home, a real estate agent can offer honest, unbiased recommendations about whether to accept or reject the proposal.

You don't need to look far to find a qualified real estate agent in your area, either.

Real estate agents are employed across the United States. In fact, if you interview multiple real estate agents in your area, you can find a real estate agent who makes you feel comfortable and confident about selling your house.

Allocate the necessary time and resources to learn various home selling terms. With a clear understanding of home selling terms, you can avoid potential pitfalls throughout the home selling journey.


While buying a home is an exciting time, many buyers actually regret their home purchase. One of the biggest regrets that people have is the size of the house they purchased. People either pick a home that’s too large or too small. It may be hard to imagine that you can make a mistake on the size of the home that your purchase. You go into the home buying process knowing how many bedrooms you need and what type of home you might like. Once you begin living in the house, you could find a different story. You may not have enough space for all of your family’s belongings. On the flip side, you could find the amount of space in your home as overwhelming. 

Buying a home isn’t like buying most other things. You can’t easily return it, and there’s quite a bit of an upfront investment that must be made in order to make the purchase. It’s not simple to make a change if you buy the wrong house. The wrong purchase could set you back in making a move for years to come. 

Shop Smart

The best thing to do when shopping for a home is not only to see the home in its current state but what type of potential the house has. Can you add on to the home? Would you be able to make use of all the space the home has? Is there enough storage in the house? Are there ways to quickly add storage? These are a lot of things to consider when shopping for a home but they’re all important questions. Once you move into the home, other than doing a complete overhaul, you may be out of options to improve it without looking for these areas. Of course, the ideal situation is to find a home that already has everything you’re looking for in it.      

Don’t Buy Until You’re Ready

Another mistake that people make is they try to go from renting to owning before they’re ready. Living in an apartment or rental allows for a bunch of advantages that owning a home may not afford you. Owning a home takes commitment, and some people just aren’t ready. Just because it’s widely known knowledge that buying a home is a smart financial decision, doesn’t mean it’s always the best decision for you. You may not be able to afford a house that’s the right size for your family. You may not even know what the right size home will be for you. When these questions remain, you could end up buying a property that’s the wrong size. Don’t worry if you need to take a few more years to save up for a house. On the contrary, don’t worry if you don’t think buying a home is the right decision for you at all.     




The weeks and days leading up to a home closing can be stressful, particularly for a homebuyer who is already trying to do everything possible to secure his or her dream residence. Fortunately, we're here to help you simplify the process of getting to your closing date.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to ensure you can enjoy a fast, easy home closing.

1. Get Your Paperwork Ready

It often helps to get all of your homebuying paperwork ready before you pursue a residence. That way, you can minimize the last-minute stress associated with searching far and wide for pay stubs, tax returns and other documents that you'll ultimately need to get financing for a residence.

Furthermore, you should meet with local banks and credit unions as soon as you can. If you can get approved for a mortgage prior to starting a home search, you may be able to speed up the process of acquiring your ideal residence.

2. Be Prepared to Cover Your Closing Costs

Although you might have financing to cover your monthly mortgage payments, it is important to remember that you may need to pay closing costs to finalize your home purchase. As such, if you begin saving for your closing costs today, you can guarantee that you'll have the necessary funds available to purchase your dream residence on your scheduled closing date.

Also, you should be prepared to present a cashier's check or wire funds when you close on a house. If you plan ahead, you should have no paying off your closing costs when your complete your home purchase.

3. Schedule Your Final Walk-Through Before Your Closing Date

When it comes to a final walk-through on your dream house, why should you leave anything to chance? Instead, set up the final walk-through at least a few days before you're scheduled to close on a house.

If you find problems with a house during a final walk-through, you'll want to give the seller plenty of time to address these issues. Thus, if you schedule a final walk-through several days before your closing date, you can ensure that any home problems can be corrected without putting your closing date in danger.

For homebuyers who are worried about a home closing, there is no need to stress. In fact, if you work with an expert real estate agent, you can receive plenty of support throughout the homebuying journey.

Typically, a real estate agent can explain what you should expect in the time leading up to your closing date. If you have any concerns or questions before a home closing, a real estate agent is happy to address them. Plus, when your closing date arrives, a real estate agent will help you remain calm, cool and collected as you purchase a home.

Ready to streamline the process of closing on a house? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can reap the benefits of a quick, seamless home closing.


 Photo by Alexander Zvir from Pexels

Those who currently own a home may consider investing in a second home for income purposes. However, it is important to understand you may have hurdles to overcome when searching for a mortgage or obtaining homeowners insurance. Here are some of the most significant differences between buying an investment property and a primary residence.

Obtaining a Mortgage

In nearly all cases, mortgage rates for investment properties are higher than when you buy a primary residence. The reason for this is that lenders tend to view an investment property as a riskier loan than a loan provided for an owner-occupied property. Lenders may also impose more stringent requirements on debt-to-income ratios and credit scoring.

The news is not all bad because while a lender may have stricter debt-to-income requirements, a portion of your anticipated rental income may help offset the change.  Not all lenders will include potential rental income, but it is worth asking about. If your mortgage lender is willing to use the rental you expect to collect as part of your income it is likely they will use a percentage of the rent, less potential repair costs, and vacancy costs.

Down Payment Requirements

Typically, if you are purchasing an investment property, the lender will require you to make a larger down payment. In many cases, you may be required to put down as much as 25 percent of the purchase price. The good news is that unlike with the purchase of a primary residence, you may be able to borrow the down payment. However, this will have an impact on your debt to income ratio because you will be paying another loan.

Greater Reserve Requirements

Your mortgage lender may have a reserve requirement when you purchase a primary residence. Reserves are generally to ensure you have an emergency fund for things like unexpected repairs. When you seek financing for an investment property your mortgage lender may require you to have a larger reserve in case your rental income decreases unexpectedly.

Potential Tax Consequences

If you are considering an investment property, you should also understand there are certain tax benefits and drawbacks. Unlike a primary residence, you will have to claim the income generated from the property. You may also get some important tax breaks so it is a good idea to talk to a tax specialist about tax issues you may face.

If you are considering investment property as a means of generating additional income and building future equity, make sure you understand the hurdles you may face. Your real estate agent can help you learn the rental history of the property, neighborhood details, and other information you should know before making this important decision.




Loading