Paula Glazebrook | Holliston MA Real Estate Real Estate, Ashland MA Real Estate Real Estate


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When you make an offer on a home, your real estate agent will create a real estate contract, also known as a purchase agreement. Before you sign this, you should make sure you understand it. This is a legally binding agreement, and you need to be certain you’ve made the right choice. So what’s really in a real estate contract? Here are the key points it will contain.

1. The Price

The price you are offering to pay for the home is a key point in the contract. This may or may not be what the seller listed the home for. Make sure your price reflects the current market trends and the condition of the property.

2. Important Dates

Your contract will include several important dates. These include:

Target date for the closing

Offer expiration date

Deadline for certain things, like the home inspection

Choose dates that are reasonable but that give you answers soon enough to make your own decisions about the purchase of the home.

3. Earnest Money

To show that you are serious about the offer, your contract will include earnest money. This is like a deposit on the purchase of the home, and the money will go towards the purchase at your closing. If you walk away from the home purchase without just cause, the seller can keep that earnest money

4. Contingencies

Contingencies are a major part of the contract, and often one that’s the least understood. These are the conditions you’re asking the seller to fulfill before you will proceed with the contract. Contingencies may include the inspection, any known repairs needed or any allowances you want to purchase items for the home or do repairs yourself. You can add any number of contingencies to the offer contract, but they do make the contract less appealing to the seller. That said, it’s always wise for buyers to make an offer contingent on inspection, as the inspection offers important protection.

5. Additional Details

Finally, the contract will include details about who pays for the various costs of the home sale, including the title insurance, closing costs, survey and inspections. It will also contain the details about how and when the utilities will change from the current owner to the new one if the sale moves forward.

Whether you are a buyer making an offer or a seller receiving one, take some time to have your real estate agent walk you through these components of the contract. Make sure you understand the document fully before you sign it. This will protect you from making a mistake on this serious and legally-binding agreement.


If you want to accomplish your desired results during the home selling journey, you should strive to host lots of showings. Fortunately, we're here to help you prepare for home showings and ensure you are ready to host showings at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you prepare for a home showing.

1. Keep Your Home Neat and Tidy

Let's face it – maintaining a pristine home can be difficult. But if you allocate time and energy to perform various home maintenance tasks daily, you can keep your home show-ready.

Cleaning up after yourself can make a world of difference. For instance, wiping down kitchen countertops after cooking a meal enables you to avoid a long, arduous kitchen clean-up at a later time.

You also may want to create a home cleaning schedule. By planning daily or weekly chores like vacuuming the rugs or cleaning the bathroom, you can ensure your house will look great at all times.

2. Be Flexible

If a homebuyer submits a last-minute request for a home showing, it generally is a good idea to try to accommodate the buyer's request. By doing so, you can show your home to many prospective buyers and increase the likelihood of receiving an offer to purchase.

A flexible home seller usually is a successful home seller. Therefore, if a buyer wants to view your home, it is important to remember that each showing brings you one step closer to selling your residence.

Ultimately, if you maintain flexibility, you can make it easy for dozens of potential buyers to view your residence. And as a result, you may be able to accelerate the home selling process.

3. Eliminate Clutter

Clutter is something that all home sellers can live without. Because if a home is filled with clutter, it may be tough for prospective buyers to appreciate the full size and beauty of a residence.

For home sellers, it is important to remove clutter immediately. A home seller can rent a storage unit to hold excess items until his or her residence sells. Or, it may be beneficial to host a yard sale or list excess items online to cut down on clutter.

As you prepare to sell your home, you may want to hire a real estate agent as well. In fact, a real estate agent will do everything possible to help you achieve the optimal results during any home showing.

Typically, a real estate agent will offer recommendations and tips to help you prepare your residence for the housing market. If you receive a request to view your home, a real estate agent will notify you accordingly. And after a home showing is complete, a real estate agent will provide you with unbiased feedback to ensure you can update your property selling strategy as needed.

Ready to host a home showing? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can get ready to showcase your residence to potential buyers and bolster your chances of enjoying a fast, profitable house selling experience.


If you're looking for a new router, chances are that you're wanting to get back online as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, it's not always easy to navigate the sheer quantity of numbers, letters and specs printed on the side of each box. The choices can seem overwhelming.

The AC standard in routers has become more the rule than the exception because the technology is faster, more reliable and easier to use. If you're considering an upgrade, use this short guide to understand more about the technology and why it's worth the investment.

Less Interference

An AC router is designed to function on a higher frequency, meaning the speed can't be bogged down by other devices that may use the signal. It also allows for more spectral bandwidth, which means you won't have to cringe every time you download a big file. AC routers aren't one-size-fits-all, though. There are different kinds designed for different applications. However, the idea is that you're improving the signal to your devices and allowing for faster transmission across the board.

Better Compatibility

AC router manufacturers took into account that while their device might be new, the devices that you're pairing it with are not. So if you're worried your old tablet is likely to resist the signal, you should know that AC routers are designed to be compatible with the older standards. Just take note that there are some exceptions and that optimum performance will only be achieved if you pair it with an AC-compatible device.

Reduced Competition

Increased internet usage at home has pushed the limits everywhere. With so many people trying to work from home, connectivity slowed to a veritable crawl in some neighborhoods. AC routers can't solve for all traffic, but they're designed to keep you online even when everyone else around you is. There are also dual-band routers available, which give you the option to split devices into two different spectrums if needed. This way, using multiple devices in one room won't interrupt a streaming service in another room.

Stronger Speeds

The speed of a router can be controlled to a certain extent, but is ultimately dependent on the conditions of your home. AC routers promise some truly remarkable speeds and the reality can be disappointing if your home is not designed well for it. However, even with inevitable slow-downs, AC routers are still exceptionally fast and markedly better than the previous generations of routers.

Why Buy an AC Router?

Even those who don't use their devices very often should look into an AC router, simply because it's become such a universal standard. If you want to upgrade your technology at some point, you're going to want a device that can keep up with the changes. Many people with home automation devices will use AC routers because they're reliable enough to support devices like smart thermostats or security systems. Those who want to either want to improve their experience now or allow for the possibility in the future should consider what an AC router can do for them.


Let's face it – clutter is an eyesore that all home sellers can live without. However, removing clutter before you list your house may prove to be difficult, particularly for those with limited time and resources at their disposal.

Fortunately, we're here to help you streamline the decluttering process. That way, you can speed up the process of improving your house's appearance and get your residence show-ready.

To better understand how to effectively declutter your home, let's take a look at three best practices for decluttering:

1. Organize Your Belongings

Old electronics, broken exercise equipment and other items can take up lots of space in your home. If you take a look at all of your belongings, you can differentiate clutter from items that you'd like to keep.

If you haven't used an item in several years or an item simply takes up space in your house, this item likely is clutter. As such, you should eliminate this item from your premises as soon as possible.

On the other hand, items that you use regularly or items that have sentimental value may prove to be keepers. With these items, you should store and maintain them properly to reduce the risk of deterioration.

2. Get Rid of Items That You No Longer Need

There may be a wide range of clutter scattered throughout your house. Although your first instinct might tell you to throw out excess items, it is important to consider whether these items could be sold or donated.

Even though a particular item no longer serves your needs, you may be able to sell this item to the highest bidder. Thus, if you post an item online or host a garage sell, you could earn extra cash by selling your clutter.

In addition, many charities will accept items that you no longer need. If you have excess items that are working properly, reach out to local charities, and these organizations may be able to pick them up at your convenience.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you plan to list your home in the next few weeks, consulting with a real estate agent is ideal. This housing market professional can offer expert decluttering recommendations and help you get your house ready for the real estate market.

Typically, a real estate agent will meet with you, evaluate your house and learn about your home selling goals. He or she also will explain the home selling process and ensure you know what to expect before you list your residence.

In most instances, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open houses, notify you about offers on your house and provide various home selling recommendations and suggestions. Plus, if you ever have questions about decluttering your home or other home selling topics, a real estate agent can provide immediate answers.

Simplify the process of decluttering your house – use the aforementioned tips, and you can remove clutter from your residence in no time at all.


Image by mnplatypus from Pixabay

Proper insulation not only helps you save on your energy bills. It reduces your energy impact on the environment and may create a great selling point for your home when the time comes. But knowing were to insulate an existing home can be a project. Here's what you need to know.

How to Do an Insulation Assessment

First, you'll need to turn off the power at the breaker box. Have your flashlights ready. 

Remove outlet covers around your home and look inside to see if you have insulation. You might not have to check every outlet, but do check them on multiple floors and one on each wall to understand how well walls are insulated. 

If you have a wall that gets hot in the summer or cold in the winter, you may want to dig deeper. Pull a little out to see what kind it is and how thick it is.

Next, check your attic, basement and crawlspaces. This insulation you can more easily see. Use a yardstick to measure its depth and look for areas that are thinner than others.

Additionally, you may consider insulating:

  • Around storm windows
  • On band joints
  • Around pipes that might freeze
  • Between the studs on a finished attic floor
  • What You'll Need to Install Installation

    There are many insulation projects you can DIY. For example, re-caulking leaky windows and sealing drafty doors can help tremendously. But you can also add insulation in the attic and basement with either loose-fill or blanket insulation. Here's what you need.

  • LED lamp clip-on. You need your hands, so flashlights won't cut it.
  • Insulation of choice
  • 1-2 3/4" plywood panels to stand on if there's no floor
  • Goggles and a mouth/nose mask to protect your eyes and lungs
  • Long sleeves and gloves to reduce residue settling on your skin. Some materials cause terrible itching and bleeding if scratched.
  • Staple gun (for rolls) or insulation blower (for loose)
  • Prep the Area

    Take this opportunity to look for leaks. If you see signs of active water damage, you need to repair it before laying insulation. Now, place your plywood so you have somewhere to stand safely.

    Lay Insulation

    Lay insulation in areas where it's lacking. You can staple it to roof beams and beams on the floor. Just cut it to size if needed. 

    Keep in mind that when you open a pack of roll insulation, it expands. So please don't open it until you have it in the general area where you want it.

    *Pro tip* To cut blanket insulation more easily to fit, lay a two-by-four over the place where you want to cut it. This temporarily compresses it there so that you have a thickness that's easier to cut through.

    If using loose insulation, power up your insulation blower and aim where padding is needed. Always, carefully rinse off after applying insulation to reduce skin and lung exposure.

    And you're ready for lower energy bills through winter and summer. For more tips DIY home maintenance tips, follow our blog.




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