Paula Glazebrook | Holliston MA Real Estate Real Estate, Ashland MA Real Estate Real Estate


There’s a lot more to interior design than simply picking out the latest trends in home decor. Design principles are also used to make the atmosphere of your home spacious and welcoming, and to make your home livable in a practical way.

 In spite of the fact that most people will own a home someday, no one is ever really taught interior design. So, it comes as little surprise that so many people are missing out on simple techniques that can drastically improve their home.

 In today’s article, we’re going to share with you some of the best interior design and decorating secrets to help you spruce up your home and make it more practical at the same time.

Low ceiling? No problem

Having a low ceiling can make it difficult to decorate and make your home seem spacious. One great workaround is to avoid tall furniture and seek out chairs with low backs, and bookcases that are wide rather than tall.

Omit hanging lights and ceiling fans and used recessed lighting instead to maximize your space and avoid having taller guests having to dodge objects hanging from the ceiling.

Finally, paint the ceiling white and remove crown molding to give the impression of openness.

Making small rooms feel larger

If you have a small home it can feel difficult to keep things uncluttered while still making sure you have everything you need. There are a few ways to make rooms feel more spacious that don’t involve throwing out your belongings.

First, add mirrors to give the illusion (literally) of space. A single or group of mirrors can be a nice decorative touch that makes a room seem much larger than it is.

Next, paint and decorate with mainly light colors or white. Dark colors will make a room feel smaller.

Lastly, take advantage of hidden storage space, such as tables with drawers underneath, and avoid putting decorations on too many surfaces. Filling the room up with objects will make it appear smaller.

The size of decorations matter

There’s a rule in interior decorating called the “cantaloupe rule.” It states that you should avoid using decorations that are smaller than a cantaloupe.

However, that doesn’t mean this rule can’t be artfully broken. A better description would be that you should omit several small decorations in favor of just a few large ones.  

Create a color palette

When choosing the color of your furniture, walls, and decoration it can be easy to just choose whichever color you like for that object rather than what works well in your home. Try making a color palette to adhere to when shopping for these items.

Create a house-wide palette and a palette for each room. Stick to three or four colors that complement each other well for each room, and make sure they aren’t too starkly contrasted from other rooms in your home.

If you aren’t sure about how to design a color palette there are several free online tools you can use to help.


Early attempts at dressing where you arrived in a striped top and polka-dot bottoms may not have earned your rewards when you were little. In fact, it may have put you off mixing patterns at all. After all, playing it safe with solids and neutrals is much less intimidating. But in your home, all that seamlessness leaves you somewhat uninspired. Here are simple, and less angst-causing ways to mix it up in your home.

Throw pillows:

Add life to the party with one stripe and one floral or geometric in similar or coordinating colors. If you want a display bolder look, use contrasting colors such as a bright red stripe with a chartreuse green geometric against your gray sofa. Or pick one large print and one small print in the same or reverse colors. Then, add a third pattern such as a stripe or plaid to pull it all together.

Change up the fabrics and textures too. Put a crisp black canvas or duck weave with a soft green and blue velour print. Or mix a paisley pattern with stripes or blocks. The variety draws the eye to multiple places and can even camouflage a dated sofa or chair.

Carpets:

Mix up your carpet styles too. If you have a traditional carpet pattern in the living room, liven it up with an overlapping sea-grass weave in high traffic areas. Place florals and paisleys within eyesight of each other or put a bold stripe in the entry to the living area.

Blankets:

Mix up those plaid plush blankets with a lovely vintage granny-square crocheted afghan or hang a hand-made quilt over the arm of a pattered high-back chair. 

Vintage pieces:

Experiment with mixing different wood colors and textures too. Place a Victorian table in a dark wood next to a mid-century arm or slipper chair with light legs. Lean a decorative brass screen against the fireplace next to a glass urn from a completely different era. Stack re-discovered suitcases as a side table and set a modern lamp with a mod-print shade on top.

The thing about mixing stripes and patterns or delicate prints with geometrics is that is the balance can come from either the design or the piece. So, a large cushion in a subtle pattern next to a smaller one with a bold stripe works because neither one outdoes the other. The key is to pick things you like, then balance them with other items that share a color or feature or are their direct opposite on the color wheel.


Humans have been thinking about the way they decorate their homes for thousands of years. In ancient India, Vastu shastra (literally, "the science of architecture") has been informing decorating techniques since as early as 6,000 BCE. The more commonly known influence for home decorating, feng shui, has its roots in ancient China where practitioners were inspired by astronomy. In the early 1900s, however, a modern science was founded that attempts to solve some of the problems that arise based on our environments. Environmental psychology is a field that focuses on the interplay between humans and the environments they live and work in. Scientists have studied the way humans (and other animals, like rats) are affected by their environment. Their findings help to inform us of how we can live more relaxed or focused based on how we decorate our home and workplace.

A place to call your own

As society becomes increasingly urbanized, many psychologists are studying the problems that arise from being in constant contact with one another, both physically and in the digital world. One thing that scientists have discovered is that it is important for humans to have a place of sanctuary during their day. Whether this is your cubicle at work, your home office, or your tool shed, everyone needs a place they can be alone. Ask yourself if your home setup provides you with a space that you can go to be alone.

How colors can affect mood

Have you ever been in a school or hospital that was painted an awful color that just made you uncomfortable? Many of us have trained ourselves to adapt and live with environments that aren't ideal for us. For example, the bright red walls of McDonald's or the blinding fluorescent lights in a department store probably aren't conditions we'd pick for our homes. Scientists have discovered that there is a correlation between colors, brightness, and our mood. Try to match the colors of your rooms with their functions. For example, you wouldn't want to paint your bedroom bright red, as your bedroom should be a place you can relax to fall asleep. Instead, go with a less-pronounced color for the bedroom.

The balance between cluttered and sterile

Much of the way we choose to decorate our homes is informed by our childhood. If you learn meticulous cleaning habits from your parents, you might carry on with this into adulthood. As a child, you probably went to a friend's house and marveled at how differently they did things. Part of that lesson is learning that the way someone chooses to decorate and clean their home is part of their personality. But like most things in life, it's important to find a balance. If you find yourself restless or distracted you should ask yourself if the room is too cluttered or messy. Maybe it's the opposite; you could just as easily become distracted or uncomfortable by an environment that is too sterile looking.

Listen to yourself

The most important thing to remember when decorating your home is to follow your intuitions. Decide if you decorated a room a certain way because that's what everyone else does or if it actually makes you feel more at home.

Summer time is just about everyone’s favorite season and therefore, favorite time of the year. It brings warm weather, beach days, and more daylight. Whether you live near the water or in the center of your state, you can still bring the summer inside. Let’s take a look at some fun and simple summer decorating ideas. Flowers: Fresh flowers are an easy but beautiful way to bring life into your home. Add them to beach themed vases for an extra touch of summer. Beach/Nautical Themed Accessories: Items like a table runner, shell vase, sand centerpieces, blue and white or red and white striped candle holders, lantern candleholders are all accessories that embody summer and adding them into your home will only enhance that happy feeling that you only feel in the summer. Window Treatments: Changing out heavy, dark window treatments for lighter and brighter ones will add a new pop of color to your home and a brighter, summery feel. Accent Pillows: Accent pillows add to the décor of your home. Adding accent pillows with bright flowers or with a nautical/beach theme are a great way to bring that summer feel inside. Striped Pieces: Adding décor with stripes is one of the easiest ways to add a touch of summer to your home. Choose navy or red stripes to make it feel even more nautical like. Outdoor Dining: Outdoor dining screams summer. It means cookouts and dinner under the stars. You don’t need to have expensive furniture or event furniture that matches; any outdoor seating and a table will work. String Lights: These are a great way to add decorative lighting to outdoor spaces, mantles, above or around doors, etc. Adding summery décor to the home doesn’t need to break the bank. And it can completely transform your home from the look it has during the fall and winter. Adding different colors and patterns to the home is a great way to rejuvenate the home after a long winter.



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